UnixServerAdmin

Server Administration & Management

How to limit CPU usage of any process in Linux

You can use cpulimit program that attempts to limit the cpu usage of a process. Limits are expressed in percentage and not in cpu time. cpulimit does not act on the nice value or other scheduling priority stuff, but on the real cpu usage. Also, it is able to adapt itself to the overall system load, dynamically and quickly.

Step-1 Install cpulimit

Type the following commands to install latest stable release:

# cd /tmp
# wget  http://downloads.sourceforge.net/cpulimit/cpulimit-1.1.tar.gz
# tar -zxvf cpulimit-1.1.tar.gz
# cd cpulimit-1.1
# make
# cp cpulimit /usr/local/sbin/
# rm -rf cpulimit*

Step-2 How do I use cpulimit?

To limit CPU usage of the process called firefox to 30%, enter:
# cpulimit -e firefox -l 30

To limit CPU usage of the process to 30% by using its PID, enter:
# cpulimit -p 1313 -l 30

To find out PID of the process use any of the following:
# ps aux | less
# ps aux | grep firefox
# pgrep -u vivek php-cgi
# pgrep lighttpd

You can also use absolute path name of the executable, enter:
# cpulimit -P /opt/firefox/firebox -l 30

Where,

-p : Process PID.
-e : Process name.
-l : percentage of CPU allowed from 0 to 100.
-P: absolute path name of the executable program file.

Root vs Normal User Account :–> cpulimit should run at least with the same user running the controlled process. But it is much better if you run cpulimit as root, in order to have a higher priority and a more precise control.

A Note About SMP (Multicore / MultiCpu) Systems :–> If your machine has one processor you can limit the percentage from 0% to 100%, which means that if you set for example 50%, your process cannot use more than 500 ms of cpu time for each second. But if your machine has four processors, percentage may vary from 0% to 400%, so setting the limit to 200% means to use no more than half of the available power. In any case, the percentage is the same of what you see when you run top.

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July 13, 2015 - Posted by | Tips & Tricks, Unix/Linux | , ,

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